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Women's Month at Virginia Tech

Women's Month 2020 graphic "Trailblazers: Women Making History"

The Women's Month calendar spotlights contributions and accomplishments of the past and present and envision a future of possibilities.  The month's theme, Trailblazers: Women Making History, recognizes the women who led movements, broke down barriers, and began dismantling systems of oppression. We celebrate those who have and those who continue to blaze trails of opportunity and advancement for all who identify as woman and girl.

Women’s Month recognizes, affirms, and showcases the achievements, concerns, and diversity of women. A feminist perspective – one that encourages and advances women of all races, political affiliations, national origins, religions, ages, abilities, sexual orientations, gender identities, and income levels – underlies all our programming. Women's Month is a non-profit community project funded by Virginia Tech, area organizations, student groups, local businesses, and citizens' contributions.  It is the combined effort of students, faculty, staff and administrators at Virginia Tech, as well as activists, residents, and civic leaders of the surrounding communities.  The annual event occurs in March in conjunction with the National Women’s History Month.

Women’s Month has historically represented Virginia Tech's broad commitment to celebrating diverse and inclusive communities. To honor this ongoing commitment, the Women’s Month 2021 calendar includes programs and events aligned with the Virginia Tech Principles of Community.

If you are an individual with a disability and desire an accommodation, please contact Ashley LeDuc at aleduc@vt.edu or 540-231-7806 during regular business hours at least 10 business days prior to the event.

March 2021 Calendar of Events

Gen(der) Ed Podcast - Trailblazers: Women Making History 
Sponsored by Women's Center and Office for Inclusion and Diversity 

In celebration of Women's History Month, we talk with Dr. Menah Pratt-Clarke, Vice President for Strategic Affairs and Diversity. This year we are featuring trailblazers who have led movements, broke down barriers, and began dismantling systems of oppression. Dr. Pratt-Clarke is not only a trailblazer with her contributions to academia but also in her current role at Virginia Tech leading efforts around diversity equity and inclusion.

Join us as she talks about her experiences of being a trailblazer and what it is like to be the "lonely only", the importance of remembering your "why", and more. 

Listen here or on your favorite podcast streaming platform. 

Exploring The 100th Anniversary of the Admission of Women
March 1st - March 31st | Newman Library
Sponsored by University Libraries and the Women's Center at Virginia Tech 

To celebrate the history and legacy of women at Virginia Tech and on the 100th anniversary of the admission of women students, Special Collections and University Archives will feature a two physical exhibits in Newman Library. The first, from March-August 2021, will explore the history of this decision on campus and the roles of women prior to the fall of 1921. The second, from August-December 2021, will explore what the experience of the first women students was, as well as the legacy of students, alumni, faculty, staff, and administrators that has followed. Each physical exhibit will have a related digital exhibit, which will be permanently available as part of our project site.

Learn more.

Clothesline Project T-shirt Kit Pickup
March 1st - March 22nd | 8AM - 5PM | Women's Center 
Sponsored by Montgomery County NOW, United Feminist Movement, Women's Center, Women's Resource Center of the NRV

Create your own T-shirt during the month of March for the Clothesline Project Display! The Clothesline Project, an effort to raise awareness of gender-based violence, is a visual testimony to the shattering effect of violence and the impact it has on society. Survivors of violence -- and friends and families of victims -- create shirts emblazoned with direct messages and strong illustrations. The shirts demonstrate the pain and suffering of the survivors, aid in their healing process, and celebrate their strength and courage to overcome the past. The shirts are hung side by side on a clothesline, as though the survivors were standing there themselves, shoulder to shoulder, bearing witness to the violence committed on a daily basis. The shirts are color coded: white for those who have died of violence; yellow or beige for survivors who have been battered or assaulted; red, pink, or orange for those raped or sexually assaulted; blue or green for survivors of incest or child sexual abuse; purple or lavender for those attacked because of their sexual orientation; and black for survivors handicapped by violence. The project encourages survivors to come forward to break the silence by creating shirts to share their stories. Materials are supplied free of charge.

To have a kit prepared for you to pick up on the porch of the Women's Center, please email Susan Anderson at anderson@vt.edu or call 540-231-8041.

Celebrating Two Medical Suffragists
March 2nd | 11:45 AM | Zoom
Sponsored by League of Women Voters of Montgomery County

Women doctors were a rarity in the 1890s and early 1900s, but Virginia and West Virginia each had a woman doctor who was an active suffragist. Come learn about these ground-breaking women on Tuesday, March 2nd at 11:45 a.m. in the First Tuesday Zoom sponsored by the League of Women Voters of Montgomery County. Elaine Powers, medical librarian at VCOM, will speak about Dr. Kate Waller Barrett of Virginia and Dr. Harriet B. Jones of West Virginia and their role in the fight for women’s suffrage. The public is invited to attend. Dr. Barrett, one of the few licensed women doctors in Virginia, was a humanitarian, philanthropist, sociologist and social reformer, best known for her leadership of the National Florence Crittenton Mission. She founded the mission in 1895 with Charles Nelson Crittenton out of concern for the welfare of unwed mothers who had few if any places to turn to for help in those days. Dr. Jones was active in the West Virginia woman suffrage movement from its inception in the 1890’s. She advocated for admission of women to West Virginia’s colleges and university, and was active in the West Virginia Federation of Women’s Clubs, the WCTU, and, later, the League of Women Voters.

Register here.

Serving as a Black Woman in the Peace Corps
March 2nd | 4:30PM - 5:30PM | Zoom
Sponsored by Center for International Research, Education, and Development

In celebration of Women's Month and Peace Corps Week/ Peace Corps 60th anniversary, returned Peace Corps Volunteer Michaela Cheatham shares her experience as a Spanish Teacher in the Dominican Republic. She will also be highlighting the work that Peace Corps volunteers do internationally to promote gender equality, women's health, and girls education.

Register here.

Self-Advocacy for Black Women
March 2nd | 6:30PM | Zoom
Sponsored by Women's Center and Black Student Association

Join us as we discuss and explore some of the unique experiences Black women face when it comes to their wellbeing, financial stability, and expectations to fulfill the role of a "strong Black woman". This conversation will address barriers and biases that Black women face as well as provide you with the skills to identify your support systems and confidently advocate for yourself.

Register here.

International Women's Day
March 8th | 10AM - 3PM | Steger Hall
Sponsored by Cranwell International Center, the Graduate School at Virginia Tech, Fralin Life Sciences Institute, the Office for Inclusion and Diversity, and the Women’s Center at Virginia Tech

International Women’s Day will be held in-person and virtually to celebrate the many accomplishments of women here in the Virginia Tech community, and all over the world. Our in-person event will be held in Steger Hall. Students will view a pre-recorded panel in the main auditorium that highlights the professional careers of our talented and accomplished panelists, Farida Jalalzai Ph.D., Helena Carvalho Ph.D., and Najla Mouchrek Ph.D., with Maria Elisa Christie Ph.D., as our facilitator. International Women’s Day is an event that welcomes all graduate and undergraduate students to come and learn about the wonderful journeys that our speakers have been on in their professional careers as women. This event presents students with the unique opportunity to hear from several different perspectives on women’s role in the professional world and today’s society. Students that attend will receive a gift bag that includes note cards to write to women who have inspired them on their journey, a plant growing kit, a cup of tea, and a sweet treat to enjoy. In addition, we will be sending 100 bags with the items listed above to participating graduate students at other campus locations along with the link to the panel discussion to be viewed on the university page as part of the virtual event option. We hope that students feel inspired and uplifted after attending and that they will continue to celebrate International Women’s Day for years to come.

Register here.

Women on Weights
Begins March 8th | 4:30PM - 5:30PM | Rec Sports Fieldhouse
Sponsored by Recreational Sports

Do you feel intimidated by the thought of going to the gym? Or are you someone who feels overwhelmed by the idea of lifting? We know that gymtimidation is real and we are here to help! Women on Weights is a small group training class specifically designed to teach the essential foundation of strength training and proper lifting technique, provide knowledge for participants to create their own workouts, and help build confidence when exercising in the gym. Come join us! Session begins March 8th and will run 4 weeks. All classes will be held at the Rec Sports Fieldhouse located at 510 Beamer Way.

Register here.

Art of Negotiation
March 9th | 12PM | Zoom
Sponsored by The Graduate School

The Graduate School invites you to attend a seminar in collaboration with WIN summit on the art of negotiation. Negotiations can be a challenging topic when searching for a position or seeking a raise. We hope this event will prepare you for current and/or future negotiation discussions.

Register here.

Leaders in CALS: Women's Month Panel in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
March 9th | 7PM - 8:30PM | Zoom
Sponsored by CALS Diversity Council, CALS Office of Academic Programs, CALS Alumni Organization

As the Virginia Tech community celebrates Women's Month 2021, the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences is proud to host a discussion panel with some of the leaders within the college. CALS Assistant Dean of Diversity and Inclusion, Dr. Chevon Thorpe, Department Head in Agricultural, Leadership, and Community Education, Dr. Tracy Rutherford, Department Head in Biochemistry, Dr. Glenda Gillaspy, Interim Department Head in Food Science and Technology, Dr. Renee Boyer, and Department Head in Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise, Dr. Stella Volpe. This event is jointly sponsored by the CALS Diversity Council, the CALS Office of Academic Programs, and the CALS Alumni Organization and will be hosted by Erin Ling, Chair CALS Diversity Council, and Molly Wilson, CALS Director of Student Recruitment.

Register here.

Faculty Women of Color Healing Hour
March 10th | 12PM - 1PM | Zoom
Sponsored by Faculty Women of Color in the Academy National Conference

Take a moment to focus, connect and empower one another. Let's also take a moment to center ourselves to draw on a more powerful and combined energy, as we appreciate the value and power of us as women of color in the academy. Joining the session will be Kim Wilson, licensed counselor and Dr. Shondrika Moss-Bouldin, Nia movement instructor.

Register here.

On Displacement Speaker Series
March 10th | 5:30PM - 7:30PM | Zoom
Sponsored by Center for Refugee, Migrant, and Displacement Studies, Office of Inclusion and Diversity, Institute for Society, Culture and Environment, Office of Outreach and International Affairs, College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences, Department of English

“On Displacement” is a speaker series highlighting researchers for whom issues of displacement are part of their work. The concept of displacement helps us focus on the temporal aspects of place within displacement, and the work of the center therefore emphasizes “the immediacy of relocation, the kairotic and active moment of movement,” defining displacement as a process rather than a destination, steeped in narrative, ideology, and epistemology. Displacement studies, then, includes inter and transdisciplinary research, art, and stories focused on the rhetorical, global, local, historical, structural, and intersectional issues of displacement. The inaugural panel in this series will focus on Virginia Tech scholars including Rachel Lin Weaver, School of Visual Arts, displacement and community art for social justice; Anamaria Bukvic, Department of Geography, climate change, coastal flooding, and decision making; Mel Jones, Center for Housing Research, housing evictions; Gena Chandler-Smith, Department of English, history of African American migration; Cana Itchuaqiyaq, Department of English (joining VT Fall 2021), climate change and indigenous communities.

Register here.

Generating High-Intensity, Ultrashort Optical Pulses
March 10th | 7:30PM | Zoom
Sponsored by College of Science

This event promotes women in the sciences and features Dr. Strickland, who is one of three women who has earned a Nobel Prize in physics

With the invention of lasers, the intensity of a light wave was increased by orders of magnitude over what had been achieved with a light bulb or sunlight. This much higher intensity led to new phenomena being observed, such as violet light coming out when red light went into the material. After Gérard Mourou and Dr. Strickland developed chirped pulse amplification, also known as CPA, the intensity again increased by more than a factor of 1,000 and it once again made new types of interactions possible between light and matter. They developed a laser that could deliver short pulses of light that knocked the electrons off their atoms. This new understanding of laser-matter interactions, led to the development of new machining techniques that are used in laser eye surgery or micromachining of glass used in cell phones.

Register here.

The Power of Poetry hosted by Jaylene Clark Owens
March 11th | 7PM - 9PM | Zoom
Sponsored by Flomigos, University Libraries, SOHHL, WUVT 90.7

Jaylene Clark is an award-winning actress and spoken word poet from Harlem, NY. She is hosting a spoken word workshop with VTDITC where she will cover how to write spoken words and how to perform. Through the workshop, our community will have an opportunity to work on writing and performance skills.

Register here.

Queer Sex Ed with Stephanie Zapata
March 11th | 7PM | Zoom
Sponsored by LGBTQ+ Resource Center & HokiePRIDE

Participants will be able to learn from Stephanie Zapata, a proud Bronx-born- Boricua sex educator & anti-oppression consultant. Conventional sex education has long disregarded the needs of system-impacted communities - Black, Latinx, low-income, and LGBTQ communities especially. This session will focus on how crucial it is for health education to be centered around sexual/reproductive liberation, not just prevention and Stephanie will be answering your questions about sexual intimacy.

Join here.

Using our Voices to Create Change: A Virtual Summit 
March 13th | 10AM - 2PM | Zoom
Sponsored by Virginia Council on Women and Women's Alliance and Caucus of Virginia Tech

Stand Up and Speak Out, Women Using Their Voices to Create Change | 10AM - 11AM
Keynote Speaker: Dr. Janice Underwood, Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, Office of the Governor

Finding our Voice in the Workplace 11AM - 12PM
Session 1 Speaker: Dr. Abrina Schnurman,  Executive Director of the Batten Leadership Institute, Hollins University

Being an Ally - Women as Allies for Each Other | 12PM - 1PM
Session 2: Speaker: Dr. Menah Pratt-Clarke, Vice President for Strategic Affairs, Inclusion, and Diversity, Virginia Tech

Building on Our History - What Remains to be Done | 1PM - 2PM
Session 3 Speakers: Dr. Sandra Treadway, Librarian of Virginia, and Megan Shockley, Historian and Author, “Creating a Progressive Commonwealth: Women Activists, Feminism, and the Politics of Social Change in Virginia, 1970s-2000s (Making the Modern South)”

For more information or questions, please contact womensalliance@vt.edu

Register here.

Representation in Leadership
March 15th | 2PM | Zoom
Sponsored by American Indian and Indigenous Community Center, LGBTQ+ Resource Center, and the Women's Center

In this "fire side chat" style Q&A, Congresswoman Sharice Davids will discuss what it means to her personally to be one of the first Native women to serve in congress and an openly gay congressional leader.

Register here.

Art Exhibit: Betsy Bannan, A Matter of Elevation 
March 15th | 12PM - 8PM | Perspective Gallery, Squires Student Center
Sponsored by Student Engagement and Campus Life

Perspective Gallery, located on the second floor of Squires Student Center, is exhibiting the artwork of Betsy Bannan. Betsy lives in Roanoke, Virginia and teaches painting in the School of Visual Arts at Virginia Tech. She has an MFA from Pratt Institute where she met her husband who is also an artist. Betsy grew up in the corn and soybean fields of Ohio and riding her bike on endless miles of flat land later became the inspiration for her oil paintings. A Matter of Elevation is derived from Betsy’s travels over the past 6 years and focuses on the journeys to get somewhere, which are often overlooked as part of the experience. Betsy says she “always gets the window seat.”

Exhibit: March 15 - May 15, 2021 Ask the Artist Interview: March 19, Noon live on Zoom. Exhibit: Tuesday - Friday: 12 p.m. - 8 p.m., Saturday: 12 - 5 p.m., Sunday: 1 - 5 p.m. 

March 19th | 12PM | Zoom

On March 19 at noon, Perspective Gallery will interview Betsy live on Zoom in our "Ask the Artist" event. We will interview Betsy Bannan who lives in Roanoke, Virginia and teaches painting in the School of Visual Arts at Virginia Tech. She has an MFA from Pratt Institute where she met her husband who is also an artist. Betsy grew up in the corn and soybean fields of Ohio and riding her bike on endless miles of flat land later became the inspiration for her oil paintings. A Matter of Elevation is derived from Betsy’s travels over the past 6 years and focuses on the journeys to get somewhere, which are often overlooked as part of the experience. Betsy says she “always gets the window seat.”

Register here for live interview. 

Exploring Strengths From a Gendered Perspective
March 18th | 12PM | Zoom
Sponsored by Office for Learning Partnerships

This event will be a dialogue in which participants will be encouraged to draw out/represent how their strengths connect to their particular gender identity. As a group, individuals will have the opportunity to share, if they are comfortable and willing, personal stories of how they came to understand their strengths and to live those strengths in a gendered world. These individual reflections will then inform a larger discussion about strengths (both in terms of Gallup’s 34 strengths and the idea of gifts/assets broadly). How do we determine which of our qualities are strengths, and how do they align with gender norms, role and narratives?

Register here.


Routes to Transportation: Women in Transportation (WTS) Speaker Panel
March 18th | 5:30PM - 7:30PM | Zoom
Sponsored by Virginia Tech Transportation Institute and Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

WTS is a national organization that attracts, sustains, connects, and advances women's careers to strengthen the transportation industry. There will be panelists from different areas in transportation (government, policy/advocacy, academia, and industry). We aim to showcase how multi-faceted transportation is, and the different ways students can be involved in the future. The goal of this panelist session is to showcase the various career paths students can pursue to improve transportation. We hope to provide students with the opportunity to interact with the women leading the way.

Register here.

Colonial Currents: Black Women, Water, Trauma, and Baptism
March 19th | 5PM - 6 PM | Zoom
Sponsored by Institute for Gender & Development Studies: Nita Barrow Unit, VT Women and Gender Studies, and the Women's Center

Anthropologist and interdisciplinary artist Alexis Alleyne-Caputo will present her short film titled  ‘Colonial Currents: Black Women, Water, Trauma, and Baptism’. Screening and discussion moderated by Ms. Leslie Toney from Virginia Tech and Ms. Leigh-Ann Worrell from IGDS:NBU. 

Register here.

Clothesline Project Display
March 23rd - 24th | 9AM - 5PM | Sidewalk on College Ave between Draper Rd. & Main St.
Sponsored by Montgomery County NOW, United Feminist Movement, Women's Center, Women's Resource Center of the NRV

The Clothesline Project, an effort to raise awareness of gender-based violence, is a visual testimony to the shattering effect of violence and the impact it has on society. Survivors of violence -- and friends and families of victims -- create shirts emblazoned with direct messages and strong illustrations. The shirts demonstrate the pain and suffering of the survivors, aid in their healing process, and celebrate their strength and courage to overcome the past. The shirts are hung side by side on a clothesline, as though the survivors were standing there themselves, shoulder to shoulder, bearing witness to the violence committed on a daily basis. The shirts are color coded: white for those who have died of violence; yellow or beige for survivors who have been battered or assaulted; red, pink, or orange for those raped or sexually assaulted; blue or green for survivors of incest or child sexual abuse; purple or lavender for those attacked because of their sexual orientation; and black for survivors handicapped by violence. The project encourages survivors to come forward to break the silence by creating shirts to share their stories.

For more information, please email Susan Anderson at anderson@vt.edu or call 540-231-8041.

Putting Your Best Foot Forward: Resumes, Cover Letters, and Interviewing-- and In an Online World
March 23rd | 2PM - 4PM | Zoom
Sponsored by University Scholarships and Financial Aid

Whether you are applying for a new job; are an internal candidate for a position; or, are applying for a leadership program, resumes, cover letters, and interviewing are integral to the process. However, we often do not think about them until it is too late and then we may not put our best foot forward in the process. These panelists will share their experiences and answer your questions. Panelists: Dr. Karen Eley Sanders--Associate Vice Provost for College Access; Dr. Kimberly Smith-- Associate Vice Provost for Student Success Initiatives; Melinda West-- Interim Assistant Vice President for Finance and University Controller; and, Beth Armstrong--Associate Vice Provost and Director, University Scholarships and Financial Aid

Register here.

“You’re a Bad B!tch and that’s Awesome!”
March 23rd | 4:30PM - 5:30PM | Zoom
Sponsored by Housing and Residence Life

When thinking about one’s leadership, it is important to recognize that it is influenced by the identities one holds, as well as the messaging that is written around those identities. During this workshop, participants will have the opportunity to explore how messaging around their gender identity has impacted their view of themselves, as a whole, as well as in the context of leadership. We will discuss how messaging is influenced by societal standards that change throughout generations as a way to name limitations ascribed to individuals because of their gender identity, and allow them to embrace the leader they are.

Register here.

Equal Pay Day
March 24th | 10AM - 12PM | Outside Owens Food Court
Sponsored by Women's Center and Hokie Wellness

Learn more about the gender pay gap and how it negatively impacts our economy and our society. Stop by for some physically distanced trivia and giveaways. 

The Learning Lunch Series with Dr. Farida Jalalzai
March 24th | 12PM - 1PM | Zoom
Sponsored by Asian Cultural Engagement Center and the Women's Center

Farida Jalalzai, Associate Dean for Global Initiatives and Engagement, College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences and Professor. Her research analyzes the roles of gender in the political arena including women national leaders. Her books include: Shattered, Cracked and Firmly Intact: Women and the Executive Glass Ceiling Worldwide (Oxford University Press 2013), which offers a comprehensive analysis of women, gender, and national leadership positions; Women Presidents of Latin America: Beyond Family Ties? (Routledge 2016), a comparative analysis of women presidents in Latin America and Senhora Presidenta: Women's Empowerment and Disempowerment in Brazil: The Rise and Fall of President Dilma Rousseff, which examines the first female president of Brazil (with Pedro dos Santos, forthcoming 2021 Temple University Press). She has published dozens of her peer reviewed journal articles and book chapters. Her research has been funded by the Thyssen Foundation and she is a recipient of the Fulbright Commission Global Scholar Award.

Register here.

Equal Pay Day Workshop
March 24th | 4PM | Zoom
Sponsored by Women's Center and Hokie Wellness

Salary negotiation workshop designed to address the gender pay gap and help college women obtain fair and realistic salaries. Determine your value, create a budget, identify a target salary, and negotiate to get the salary and benefits you deserve. 

Join our workshop here.

Revolutionary Visions and Practices of Care
March 25th | 2PM - 3:30PM | Zoom
Sponsored by Department of Religion and Culture

"Revolutionary Visions and Practices of Care” brings together two scholar-activists on the politics, ethics, and practice of care in the contemporary. Dr. Maryam Aziz (Penn State) and Dr. Ren-yo Hwang (Mount Holyoke) will discuss their respective and intersecting visions for care in the contemporary spanning abolitionist politics, decarceration, queer and trans of color politics, self-defense, solidarity, and the collective empowerment of vulnerable communities. In conversation with Dr. Balbir K. Singh (VT, Religion and Culture), both Aziz and Hwang will shed light on their creative visions, writings, and active forms of care for minoritarian peoples.

Register here.

GaySL with Hayden Kristal
March 25th | 6:30PM | Zoom
Sponsored by Services for Students with Disabilities & LGBTQ+ Resource Center

This highly interactive, variable, and hilarious workshop teaches its participants LGBTQ-related American Sign Language signs while fostering a group discussion about Deaf culture, intersectionality, accessibility and more. During the presentation participants will be encouraged to sign along as we learn the signs for GAY, LESBIAN, BISEXUAL, TRANSGENDER, QUEER, GENDER, ALLY, COMING-OUT, PARTNER, BINARY, DRAG KING/QUEEN, IDENTITY, RAINBOW, PRIDE, etc., as well as requested signs. The signs serve as jumping off points for discussion about the intersection of Deafness and Queerness. (Example: ALLY- how does Deaf culture perceive LGBTQ people? How are the Deaf received by the LGBTQ community? What can you do to be a better ally to both groups?) The goal for this workshops is not that participants will leave fluent in ASL. The point is to get people thinking about Deafness, disability, and the struggles faced by LGBTQ people who are also Deaf or disabled; to inspire people to learn more, and create accessibility to allow ALL LGBTQ people to utilize their resources and participate in their events.

Join the session here.

Gender, Bias, and Technology in the 21st Century Workplace
March 30th | 6PM | Zoom
Sponsored by Center for Business Intelligence and Analytics (CBIA)

The #MeToo movement has focused new attention on the enduring problems of workplace sexual harassment and sex discrimination. At the same time, companies’ experiments with computational tools to aid in hiring, evaluation, and promotion have threatened to amplify the effects of systemic sexism, racism, and other forms of employment discrimination. Professor Alexander will explore the themes of gender, bias, and technology in today’s workplace. She will highlight ways that employers can use computational tools to identify and avoid bias, rather than merely replicating past discrimination, and build a more diverse, equitable, and inclusive workforce. Learn how bias can be replicated in the workplace by data analytics Learn how bias can be avoid bias in the workplace by data analytics.

Register here.

The Body is Not an Apology: Radical Self-Love as Transformative Action
March 30th | 7PM | Zoom
Sponsored by VT Women's Center

Sonya Renee Taylor is the Founder and Radical Executive Officer of The Body is Not An Apology, a digital media and education company promoting radical self-love and body empowerment as the foundational tool for social justice and global transformation. Sonya’s work as a highly sought-after award-winning Performance Poet, activist, and transformational leader continues to have global reach. Sonya is a former National and International poetry slam champion, author of two books, including The Body is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love educator and thought leader. Her book,  The Body Is Not an Apology, offers radical self-love as the balm to heal the wounds inflicted by these violent systems.

Sonya Renee Taylor invites us to reconnect with the radical origins of our minds and bodies and celebrate our collective, enduring strength. As we awaken to our own indoctrinated body shame, we feel inspired to awaken others and to interrupt the systems that perpetuate body shame and oppression against all bodies. When we act from this truth on a global scale, we usher in the transformative opportunity of radical self-love, which is the opportunity for a more just, equitable, and compassionate world--for us all.

Register here.

If you are an individual with a disability and desire an accommodation, please contact Ashley LeDuc at aleduc@vt.edu or 540-231-7806 during regular business hours at least 10 business days prior to the event.


Featured Women

The women featured in the Women's Month 2021 graphic were chosen for many reasons. Some were the first in their profession or field, some played essential roles in their activism, some changed the way we think about culture, and some women broke down gender and race barriers to increase the representation of women of color. While there are many commonalities, the one thing that all of these women have in common is that they blazed trails for those to come after them. 

Learn more about the women featured.